Two-headed GOAT that feeds with both mouths is born

Two-headed GOAT that eats with both mouths is born on a Wisconsin farm – and named Janus after a Roman god with two faces

  • The rare goat was born on the Nueske family farm in Wittenberg, Wisconsin
  • Scans show the goat has two ‘fully-formed’ craniums which fuse at the spine
  • Two-heads occur when an embryo partially splits, known as polycephaly

A farmer has been left amazed after one of her goats birthed a two-headed kid able to eat with both heads.

The incredible creature was born on the Nueske family farm in Wittenberg, Wisconsin, after its mother was found struggling to deliver her baby.

Jocelyn Nueske, who manages and milks the goats, has named the animal Janus after the Roman god usually depicted with two faces. 

The family were hoping to keep Janus as a pet, however were fearful that it would not survive and put its chances on a knife-edge.

But they have been buoyed following a trip to a clinic where scans showed that Janus was a ‘normal baby goat’.

The incredible creature was born on the Nueske family farm in Wittenberg, Wisconsin, after its mother was found struggling to deliver her baby


Jocelyn Nueske, who manages and milks the goats, has named the animal Janus after the Roman god usually depicted with two faces

Posting on the farm’s Facebook page, the family revealed that it is thought the animal has two brains which are fused together at the back of his skulls.

He has two ‘fully-formed’ craniums which are also fused to the spinal cord, while his heart, lungs and limbs are all functioning properly.

But while the animal seems to have a pair of nearly everything, vets confirmed he only has one stomach. 

It adds: ‘Baby Janus continues to amaze us and we are happy to have Wisconsin Valley Veterinary Service on board to help us look after his well being.’ 

Two-headed creatures can occur when an embryo splits, as if to form twins, but it does not split completely, in a process known as polycephaly.

Posting on the farm’s Facebook page, the family revealed that it is thought the animal has two brains which are fused together at the back of his skulls

It can also occur the other way around, with two separate embryos incompletely fusing to form a two-headed creature.  

Recalling Janus’s birth last week, Jocelyn said: ‘I noticed that the mother was having troubles having her second baby, which was completely normal.

‘I started to assist her and I was very confused at first but then I realized the heads were attached and I was very shocked. It had four legs, two ears, four eyes and two noses.

‘We have been milking goats for six years and never had anything like this. We usually have around 700 babies born each year and nothing like this has ever happened until now.’    

 She added: ‘We’re just doing the best we can to keep him strong and healthy, and hoping for the best. 

‘We are a very caring family farm, we try our best to help any animal we can.’  

Why do a small number of animals have two heads? 

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Two-headed animals have a condition called polycephaly, which derives from the Greek word poly, meaning ‘many’ and kephale, meaning ‘head’.

Two-headed creatures can occur when an embryo splits, as if to form twins, but it does not split completely.

It can also occur the other way around, with two separate embryos incompletely fusing to form a two-headed creature.

Animals with this condition, also referred to as dicephalic parapagus, have two heads on one torso.

Each head of a polycephalic animal has its own brain, and they share control of the organs and limbs, though the specific structure of the connections varies between each case.

Animals with the condition rarely live beyond a few months.

They are referred to as bicephalic or dicephalic if the animals have two heads. If they have three heads they are referred to as tricephalic.

Although rare, two-headed animals have been documented since the 1800s.

Two heads can share control of one’s organs and limbs. When animals have the condition, at times, their brains fight with each other.

This can cause them to move about in a disoriented way as if they are not sure where they are going.

Scientists have not determined an element that creates a distinct difference between two beings sharing one body and one body with two heads. 

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