NHS U-turns on puberty-blocking drugs for transgender teens

NHS quietly U-turns on its guidelines for controversial puberty-blocking drugs for transgender teens which could have long-term effects on brains, bones and mental health

  • Drugs may have consequences for youngsters’ brains, bones and mental health
  • The U-turn by the NHS will give succour to supporters of the author JK Rowling
  • Harry potter writer raised concerns about the potential dangers of trans agenda

The NHS has quietly changed its guidelines on the use of controversial transgender drugs for children who J K Rowling last week described as ‘fragile’ teenagers being encouraged into making irreversible decisions they might later regret.

The drugs – used by NHS gender clinics to halt the puberty of supposedly transgender children – could have long-term consequences for youngsters’ brains, bones and mental health, the health service has now admitted.

The U-turn by the NHS will give succour to supporters of the Harry Potter author who has raised concerns about the potential dangers of the trans agenda.

The drugs – used by NHS gender clinics to halt the puberty of supposedly transgender children – could have long-term consequences for youngsters’ brains, bones and mental health, the health service has now admitted

In a deeply personal blog last week, Ms Rowling noted the sharp rise in the number of children being seen at gender identity clinics, adding: ‘Studies have consistently shown that between 60-90 per cent of gender dysphoric teens will grow out of their dysphoria.’

Now The Mail on Sunday can reveal that the NHS guidance on the treatment of children with gender issues has been entirely rewritten to state: ‘Little is known about the long-term side effects of hormone or puberty blockers in children with gender dysphoria.

‘Although the Gender Identity Development Service advises this is a physically reversible treatment if stopped, it is not known what the psychological effects may be. It’s also not known whether hormone blockers affect the development of the teenage brain or children’s bones. Side effects may also include hot flushes, fatigue and mood alterations’.

The U-turn by the NHS will give succour to supporters of the Harry Potter author who has raised concerns about the potential dangers of the trans agenda 

The NHS previously announced a review of cross-sex hormone treatments, but until now the service had defended the use of puberty-blockers, assuring parents that they are safe and ‘fully reversible’.

Trans rights groups want health chiefs to make it easier for children to receive the drugs. Ms Rowling has denied claims that she is transphobic, adding that her motivation was to protect children.

An NHS spokesman said: ‘An independent expert group will review the evidence underpinning the use of puberty blockers.’

Source: Read Full Article