Cop is CHEERED by 100 colleagues as he hands himself in for assault

Philadelphia cop is CHEERED by 100 of his colleagues as he hands himself in on assault charges for attacking a protester – as city council tells mayor it will not support increases to police budget

  • A Philadelphia police inspector was cheered and applauded by a procession of dozens of his colleagues Monday as he handed himself in on assault charges
  • Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna was charged with aggravated assault, simple assault, possession of an instrument of crime and reckless endangerment
  • The charges stem from a viral video appeared to show him hitting a Temple University student in the head with a baton who was peacefully protesting
  • More than 100 officers – both in and out of uniform – gathered outside of Lodge 5 of the Fraternal Order of Police just after 8:30am in a display of solidarity
  • Bologna reportedly waved at those gathered and shouted ‘thank you’
  • The fallout comes as fourteen members of Philadelphia’s City Council have told Mayor Jim Kenney they do not support his increase in police funding

A Philadelphia police inspector was cheered and applauded by a procession of dozens of his colleagues on Monday as he handed himself in on charges stemming from the alleged assault of a protester.

Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna was charged with aggravated assault, simple assault, possession of an instrument of crime and reckless endangerment after a viral video appeared to show him hitting a Temple University student in the head with a baton who was peacefully protesting in the city against the death of George Floyd last week.

More than 100 officers – both in and out of uniform – gathered outside of Lodge 5 of the Fraternal Order of Police just after 8:30am in a display of solidarity with Bologna, applauding him as he was escorted out from the building by his lawyer and to an SUV waiting to transport him to the police district.

A smaller crowd had also gathered outside the 15th district to offer their support as he arrived to turn himself in. Bologna reportedly waved at those gathered and shouted ‘thank you’ before heading inside, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.


Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna was charged with aggravated assault, simple assault, possession of an instrument of crime and reckless endangerment last week

The charges stem from -a viral video that appeared to show him hitting a Temple University student in the head with a baton who was peacefully protesting in the city against the death of George Floyd on June 1

The video footage of Bologna striking student Evan Gorski with a baton on June 1 went viral last week, prompting Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw to launch an internal investigation into the Staff Inspector’s conduct and removed him from street duty.

Later the same day, Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner announced the assault charges against Bologna.

In a statement, prosecutors said that Gorski had been arrested and detained for a day following the incident. They later declined to charge the student after reviewing the footage and other evidence from the scene, officials said.

Prosecutors added that Gorski suffered ‘serious bodily injury, including a large head wound ‘that required treatment in a hospital while under arrest’. The student required 10 staples and approximately 10 sutures, Krasner’s office said.

President of FOP Lodge 5, John McNesby, denounced the charges against Bologna, claiming them to be the absurd result of Krasner’s ‘anti-police agenda’.

‘He never ever even came close to the head, it was shoulder strike, it’s what we are trained to do,’ McNesby told ABC. ‘The proper procedures were followed. Our guidelines were followed.’

When questioned how Groski suffered the head injury if he was only struck in the shoulder, McNesby replied: ‘That’s something you’d have to ask him, I don’t know how he got those staples. He sure as hell didn’t get them from Joe Bologna.’

More than 100 officers – both in and out of uniform – gathered outside of Lodge 5 of the Fraternal Order of Police just after 8:30am in a display of solidarity with Bologna, applauding him as he was escorted out from the building by his lawyer and to an SUV waiting to transport him to the police district

The video footage of Bologna striking student Evan Gorski with a baton on June 1 went viral last week, prompting Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw to launch an internal investigation into the Staff Inspector’s conduct and removed him from street duty

McNesby added that Bologna, a near 31-year veteran of the department, found himself embroiled in a ‘volatile’ situation and only had ‘milliseconds to make a decision’.

‘Along with arsonists, looters and thieves, Krasner is complicit in the destruction of our great city,’ he said in a statement, vowing to ‘vigorously defend Bologna against these baseless allegations and charges.’

Bologna’s attorney, Fortunato Perri Jr., also released a statement decrying his client’s charges.

‘Inspector Bologna and his fellow officers were spit on, sprayed with urine and other chemicals as well as verbally and physically assaulted,’ Perri Jr.’s statement read. ‘His use of force to apprehend an individual, who was trying to thwart a lawful arrest during a melee, was lawful and justified.’

Other supporters of the embattled inspector have insisted he’s beloved in all the communities he’s served, insisting he’s gregarious and widely respected.

Despite the praise, more videos have also emerged on social media of Bologna using aggressive measures in response to demonstrators, including one exchange from Tuesday in which the officer was seen throwing his bicycle and lunging at a female protestor after she appeared to lightly touch his bike.

To support Bologna, dozens of his fellow officers attempted to organize a ‘blue flu’ – or a number of officers all calling in sick simultaneously – ahead of demonstrations that saw thousands flock to the city center to protest. The idea was later admonished by police commanders who warned such a move would only endanger the lives of their fellow officers.

A GoFundMe page was also set up for Bologna over the weekend, which had already raised nearly $25,000 by Monday.

Supporters of the embattled inspector have insisted he’s beloved in all the communities he’s served, insisting he’s gregarious and widely respected.

To support Bologna, dozens of his fellow officers attempted to organize a ‘blue flu’ – or a number of officers all calling in sick simultaneously – ahead of demonstrations that saw thousands flock to the city center to protest. The idea was later admonished by police commanders who warned such a move would only endanger the lives of their fellow officers

The fallout involving Bologna comes as fourteen out of the 17 members of Philadelphia’s City Council signed a letter addressed to Mayor Jim Kenney, saying they will not support the proposed $14 million increase to the police budget for Fiscal year 2021.

In the letter, the council members wrote: ‘It is counterproductive to increase spending on the Police Department while cutting spending on public health, housing, social services, violence prevention, youth programs, libraries, parks, recreation centers and the arts.’

The letter follows on the heels of Minneapolis City Council announcing plans to disband their police department and invest instead in a community-led public safety model. Activists in Philadelphia are urging their council to follow suit and ‘defund the police’.

‘It does not mean that the police need to disappear tomorrow, it means that our resources that our city allocates are being grossly mismanaged and the police are getting much more than is feasible,’ Elizabeth Gardiner, Union Member of AFSCME DC 47, explained to ABC 6.

Gardiner and members from the Campaign for a Just Philly Budget are hosting a People’s Budget Hearing on Monday evening.

‘Libraries and parks and rec are a huge way that crime can be reduced because it provides people with outlets for their time and to connect with resources,’ said Gardiner. ‘So shifting money from the police to our communities’ resources is proven to help people and reduce crime.’

McNesby, meanwhile, has insisted the idea of ‘defunding the police’ would prove to be an unmitigated disaster.

‘It doesn’t make sense,’ said McNesby. ‘You’re taking away from your community, you’re taking resources out of your community. Look at the crime we have now–nobody is going to want to come to Philadelphia if it’s not safe.’

The fallout involving Bologna comes as fourteen out of the 17 members of Philadelphia’s City Council signed a letter addressed to Mayor Jim Kenney, saying they will not support the proposed $14 million increase to the police budget for Fiscal year 2021


In the letter, the council members wrote: ‘It is counterproductive to increase spending on the Police Department while cutting spending on public health, housing, social services, violence prevention, youth programs, libraries, parks, recreation centers and the arts.’

Currently, the city’s proposed budget will allocated $760 million to the police department, which is around 15 percent of the city’s total budget. The second largest recipient, would be the city’s fire department, which would receive $320 million.

Mike Dunn, the spokesperson for Mayor Jim Kenney’s office, said their 1.6 percent proposed increase to the police budget includes anti-racist training, body cameras, adding to the intelligence bureau and public safety officers as well as salary increases to officers serving on the front lines of COVID-19. 

‘We all have reasons to be deeply disturbed by systemic racism that has plagued our society for far too long, including disparities in policing, and we appreciate residents’ civic engagement and action to hold the city accountable,’ Dunn said to ABC. 

‘It is important to note that Philadelphia City Council ultimately approves the budget. We encourage residents to make their voices heard at upcoming budget hearings that are being held virtually due to the pandemic.’

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