Boys, 15 and 16, were members of far-right Telegram group

Boys, 15 and 16, who were members of far-right Telegram group with 38 subscribers on which one boasted of planning an ‘attack on Dover’ admit terror offences

  • Boy, 15, talked of planning an attack on the Dover coast in right-wing group
  • He said town was ‘where every Muslim and refugee been given safety’
  • Member of the group, 16, sent link to the ‘White Resistance Manual’

Schoolboys aged just 15 and 16 have admitted terrorism offences, with one laughing at police who arrested them while the other boasted ‘I’m far right and you guys don’t like it’.

The younger of the teenagers, who is from South Derbyshire, talked of planning an attack on the Dover coast in an extremist right-wing group he set up online.

His encrypted The British Hand on Telegram had just 38 subscribers, and was set up on August 5 last year using an icon of a Union Jack emblazoned with a skull and two rifles.

The older boy, who is from Kent, was a member of the illegal group and were due to stand trial together at Westminster Magistrates’ Court.

It is the latest in a series of far-right terror cases involving teenagers, which have seen one as young as 12 convicted. 

In one of his posts, the 15-year-old wrote in all capital letters: ‘I am planning a attack against the Dover coast where every Muslim and refugee has been given safety if your interested tell me now.’

He is said to have vetted others into private chat groups, where they talked about ‘doing something’ against ethnic minorities, and discussed weapons.

He pleaded guilty to possessing a terrorist publication, called ‘the Anarchy Cookbook Version 2000’, disseminating a terrorist publication, and encouraging terrorism, in August and September last year.

The younger of the teenagers, from South Derbyshire, talked of planning an attack in Dover

His encrypted The British Hand on Telegram had just 38 subscribers and was formed last year

Prosecutors say the youngster encouraged the group to read the document, which included instructions on bomb-making and other methods useful for preparing acts of terrorism.

The court heard he has a previous conviction after threatening to blow up a mosque on January 20 last year in what Chief Magistrate Paul Goldspring said had been described to him as a ‘bomb hoax, a prank and a joke’.

He was handed a referral order on September 25 2020 after pleading guilty to an offence under the Malicious Communications Act.

The 16-year-old boy admitted disseminating a terrorist publication by sending an electronic link that allowed others to access a terrorist publication, called the ‘White Resistance Manual’, in August last year.

The document is said to be a guide to committing terrorism in the name of right-wing extremism.

Mr Goldspring adjourned sentencing for both boys, who cannot be identified because of their age, to August 3 for reports to be prepared, but said: ‘The custody threshold has been crossed.’

Both teenagers were due to stand trial at Westminster Magistrates Court today

The 15-year-old, who appeared by video-link from a youth remand centre, was remanded in custody, while the older boy, who appeared in court with his mother, was granted conditional bail.

Both boys were first arrested on September 22 last year and an analysis of their computers and mobile phones revealed a ‘deep-rooted, extreme right-wing, racist ideology, of an abhorrent and concerning nature,’ according to prosecutors.

Police found a large quantity of extreme right-wing propaganda, including images, videos, documents and messages.

The 15-year-old downloaded a video of the Christchurch mosque terror attacks, in which gunman Brenton Tarrant shot and killed 51 people, and saved an image of a British police officer with a gun to his head.

The 16-year-old recorded a video of footage showing a concentration camp soldiers shooting a prisoner and saved a montage of Hitler and Nazis set to music.

After the 15-year-old was first arrested at the home where he lived with his mother, he told officers: ‘Basically I’m far-right and you guys don’t like it.’

Police seized a jumper with right-wing emblems, which was seen in one of the online chats before he was re-arrested on December 10 last year.

When asked about the Anarchist Cookbook, he said: ‘Actually I do remember that, did you manage to find the others?’

The court heard the 15-year-old admitted the offences on the basis his actions were ‘reckless’ rather than ‘intended’.

The 16-year-old admitted being part of the group when he was arrested at his home. He said: ‘They were talking about stuff.

‘I didn’t really do a whole lot, just spoke to them about a few things, then after that I decided it was a bit too much and left it.

‘It’s one of the reasons I left the group, I didn’t want to go down, whatever they were going towards, I still love England. They took it a bit too far, I was just trying to fit in.’

When he was re-arrested, he said: ‘I didn’t expect you to come so soon.’

Britain’s far-right terror teenagers 

In February, Britain’s youngest convicted terrorist who led a Hitler-worshipping cell from his grandmother’s cottage in rural Cornwall walked free from court after being spared jail.

The teenager, who committed a string of terror offences between the ages of 13 and 15, became the leader of the UK branch of Feuerkrieg Division (FKD) in 2019. 

In February, Britain’s youngest convicted terrorist who led a Hitler-worshipping cell from his grandmother’s cottage in rural Cornwall walked free from court after being spared jail. He is seen making a Nazi salute, but can’t be identified due to his age  

Jack Reed, was jailed after police uncovered his plans to firebomb synagogues and other buildings in the Durham area 

When police raided his grandmother’s home they found a swastika flag and the extremist codes ’14 88′ – standing for ‘Heil Hitler’ painted across the garden shed.

He was also found with a manual containing bomb-making plans, ingredients for napalm, and instructions on how to make Molotov cocktails, build an AK47 assault rifle, and engage in knife combat.

He wrote racist and anti-Semitic posts online and spoke about ‘gassing’ Jewish people, hanging homosexuals and wanting to ‘shoot up their parades’.

He pleaded guilty to 12 offences – two of dissemination of terrorist documents and 10 of possession of terrorist material.

Judge Mark Dennis QC told the boy he had ‘entered an online world of wicked prejudice’ and any reoffending would lead to a ‘spiral of ever-lengthening terms of incarceration’ to protect the public.

But the judge took account of his guilty plea, expression of remorse and that the teenager was ‘susceptible to the influence of others’.

Paul Dunleavy, 17, of Rugby, became a member of the far-Right group Feuerkrieg Division

In November, a 17-year-old autistic boy with far-Right views who offered to build weapons for people online was jailed for more than five years.

Paul Dunleavy, of Rugby, Warwickshire, had become a member of Feuerkrieg Division (FKD) in July 2019 and started several online conversations.

The boy expressed his extreme views in the chats and indicated he was planning or had already converted a blank firing weapon into a viable firearm.

Police found his phone had more than 90 documents on firearms, explosives and military tactics, extreme Right-wing online material and the online chats.

It came after another teenager, Jack Reed, was jailed after police uncovered his plans to firebomb synagogues and other buildings in the Durham area.

The quality surveyor’s son, then 17, grew up in a middle-class home and attended one of the best state schools in the country.

But in January 2020 he was convicted of attempting to obtain ingredients to make explosives in a twisted bid to start a ‘race war’ in his home city of Durham.  

Meanwhile, January this year saw the release of Britain’s second youngest convicted terrorist from prison, a teenager from Blackburn who was 14 when he told Islamist radical Sevdet Besim, 18, to murder police officers during an Anzac Day parade in Melbourne. 

 

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